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BCAFN Annual General Meeting Webcast

The BC Assembly of First Nations is pleased to be holding it’s 15th Annual General meeting this week in Vancouver. BC Chiefs will be gathering in Musqueam territory, at the Musqueam Community Centre, to attend this three day (October 22-24) event. Each day begins at 9:00 AM.

Critical issues to be discussed include: governance, legislation on the implementation of UNDRIP, environmental assessment, proposed federal legislation on the implementation of Indigenous Rights framework, sustainable economic development and fiscal relations strategy, children and families, fisheries and more.

All 3 days will be webcast and can be viewed on YouTube at the following link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJHyjwUe6xh7lSh0f2xotPA/live

For more information contact Annette Schroeter, Communications Officer: annette.schroeter@bcafn.ca

NT5

First Nations, environment groups say latest energy board pipeline review flawed – CP

Source: The Canadian Press
Oct 23, 2018

VANCOUVER _ Indigenous leaders in British Columbia are threatening future court challenges of the National Energy Board’s review of the marine shipping effects of an expanded Trans Mountain pipeline.

Grand Chief Phillip Stewart, of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, says the project is a “stinker” that will worsen climate change, which is already contributing to devastating wildfires and flooding in the province.

The Federal Court of Appeal ruled in August that the energy board failed to examine the project’s impacts on the marine environment, including B.C.’s endangered southern resident killer whales, and the federal government ordered the board to reconsider that part of the process by Feb. 22.

Eugene Kung of West Coast Environmental Law says the review is rushed and too limited in scope, as it only covers up to 12 nautical miles off the B.C. coastline, and is likely to prompt fresh court challenges from the project’s opponents.

Kung says the National Energy Board seems to have learned nothing from the court ruling and is repeating many of the same errors that landed it in court the last time.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government has purchased the existing pipeline and expansion project for $4.5 billion, and Phillip accused Trudeau of lacking a conscience or any concern for future generations of Canadians.

INDEX: OIL&GAS NATIONAL BUSINESS POLITICS

The Hidden Life of Trees in Kwiakah Territory – Coast Funds

October 23, 2018

Author Peter Wohlleben is teaming up with Kwiakah First Nation for a segment a documentary based on his best-selling book, The Hidden Life of Trees. The Nation is concerned about the impacts of industrial-scale logging in the Phillips Arm watershed.

It’s not every day you can say celebrated environmentalist David Suzuki and international best-selling author Peter Wohlleben are coming to pay you a visit. But Chief Steven Dick of Kwiakah First Nation, and Frank Voelker, the Nation’s band manager, were able to do just that when a documentary film crew—whose team included Suzuki and Wohlleben—visited Kwiakah territory in fall 2018.

The film being made by Constantin Film aims to convey the impact of Wohlleben’s immensely popular book, The Hidden Life of Trees: What they Feel, How they Communicate – Discoveries from a Secret World.

Read More: https://coastfunds.ca/news/the-hidden-life-of-trees-in-kwiakah-territory/

TMAC Resources Provides Notice of Timing for Third Quarter 2018 Results

TORONTO—- TMAC Resources Inc. (TSX: TMR) (“TMAC” or the “Company”) plans to release its third quarter 2018 financial results after market close on Thursday, November 8, 2018, followed by a conference call and webcast the following morning.

CONFERENCE CALL AND WEBCAST

Senior management will host a conference call and webcast on Friday, November 9, 2018 at 10:00 am (ET).

In order to participate in the conference call please dial (416) 915-3239 (Toronto local or international) or 1 (800) 319-4610 for toll-free within Canada and the United States at least five minutes prior to the scheduled start of the call. Alternatively, a live audio webcast of the conference call will be available at http://services.choruscall.ca/links/tmacresources20181109.html. An archive of the webcast will be available on the Company’s website.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20181023005864/en/

TMAC Resources Inc.
Jason Neal, 416-628-0216
President and Chief Executive Officer
or
Ann Wilkinson, 416-628-0216
Vice President, Investor Relations
www.tmacresources.com
or
Renmark Financial Communications Inc.
Daniel Gordon, (416) 644-2020 or (514) 939-3989
dgordon@renmarkfinancial.com
www.renmarkfinancial.com

NT4

Honorary degrees a highlight at UVic fall convocation

October 23, 2018

Four people noted for their remarkable achievements in social justice, early childhood education, sustainable agriculture and music will be recognized with honorary degrees at fall convocation Nov. 13-14 at the University of Victoria.

Renowned social activist and Gitxsan First Nation member Cindy Blackstock, former BC lieutenant governor and sustainable farming proponent Judith Guichon, early childhood education leader Peter Moss, and acclaimed singer and teacher Mitsuko Shirai will all receive the university’s highest academic honour at fall convocation ceremonies.

A total of 1,492 UVic students will be receiving degrees, diplomas and certificates at the November ceremonies.

Cindy Blackstock, Honorary Doctor of Laws (LLD)

Tuesday, Nov. 13 | 10 a.m.

Cindy Blackstock is a social justice pioneer and dedicated advocate for Indigenous children with 30 years of social work experience in child protection and the rights of Indigenous children. She is a professor in McGill University’s School of Social Work and adjunct professor and director of the First Nations Children’s Action Research and Education Centre at the University of Alberta. Blackstock also serves as executive director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada.

Blackstock and her advocacy group battled for years in front of the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal to demonstrate that First Nations children on reserve were receiving significantly less funding for public services compared to other children in Canada. In 2016, the tribunal decided in Blackstock’s favour and subsequently ordered the federal government to equitably fund First Nations child welfare.

The case led to the implementation of Jordan’s Principle, a child-first policy to ensure First Nations children receive public services when they need them. More than 111,000 services have since been provided to children in need under Jordan’s Principle since the 2016 tribunal ruling.

Blackstock’s promotion of culturally based equity for First Nations children and families, and engaging children in reconciliation, has been recognized by the Nobel Women’s Initiative, the Aboriginal Achievement Foundation, and Frontline Defenders among others. An in-demand public speaker, she has authored more than 60 publications. Blackstock lives in Ottawa and is a commissioner with the Pan American Health Organization Commission on Health Equity and Inequity.

Judith Guichon, Honorary Doctor of Laws (LLD)

Tuesday, Nov. 13 | 2:30 p.m.

Judith Guichon is a strong voice for sustainable farming and ranching in British Columbia and the former lieutenant governor of BC. Before she began her six-year term as lieutenant governor in 2012, Guichon owned and operated Gerard Guichon Ranch Ltd. in the province’s Interior region. Guichon’s family had owned land in the Nicola Valley since 1878 and maintained a tradition of farming, ranching and related community service.

Guichon’s many contributions include serving as president of the British Columbia Cattlemen’s Association. She has also served with the Provincial Force on Species at Risk, the Ranching Task Force of BC, the British Columbia Agri-Food Trade Advisory Council, the Fraser Basin Council of British Columbia, and as a director of the Grasslands Conservation Council of BC. She and her family have long promoted holistic farm management and an approach to farming that seeks to preserve ecosystems, maintain plant species, protect water quality and reduce use of fossil fuels.

Guichon received the Order of BC in 2012. In her role as lieutenant governor, Guichon developed priority programs reflecting her background of stewardship, including the creation of Stewards of the Future, which aims to reconnect high school students with the natural world. Guichon lives in Quilchena, BC, near Merritt.

Peter Moss, Honorary Doctor of Education (DEd)

Wednesday, Nov. 14 | 10 a.m.

Peter Moss is professor emeritus at England’s University College London and recognized for his international work in early childhood education, in particular the relationship between employment, care and gender, with a special focus on parental leave policies. Moss coordinated the European Commission’s expert group on childcare and other measures to reconcile employment and family responsibilities. The breadth and quality of the group’s work resulted in more than 30 published reports and enhanced its international reputation.

In 2004, Moss co-founded the International Network on Leave Policies and Research, which today brings together experts from 40 countries with a shared interest in a policy area that has since become a central issue in the modern welfare state.

For a decade, Moss was co-editor of the book series Contesting Early Childhood, which provides an important platform for alternative voices and new ideas in the field of early childhood education. The series builds on previous work Moss had undertaken with Alan Pence in UVic’s School of Child and Youth Care, including the seminal book Beyond Quality in Early Childhood Education and Care.

Moss has had a direct influence through his presentations and publications on the curricula of UVic’s School of Child and Youth Care, particularly its early-years stream. His ideas also influenced the British Columbia Early Learning Framework, which guides the provision of early childhood services in the province and is recognized internationally for its emphasis on diversity. He currently lives in London, England.

Mitsuko Shirai, Honorary Doctor of Music (DMus)

Wednesday, Nov. 14 | 2:30 p.m.

Mitsuko Shirai is regarded as one of the world’s great interpreters of the German lied, a form of poetic art song that is set to classical music. She was born and raised in Japan and began her vocal studies there at the Musashino Music Academy in Tokyo. She received a grant to continue her training at the Hochschule der Künste in Stuttgart, Germany.

Shirai is one of the most frequently recorded lieder singers of modern times. She is distinguished not only by her many stellar concert performances and recordings, but also by her illustrious teaching career. For more than 27 years, Shirai has taught at the Hochschule für Musik Karlsruhe, one of Germany’s top professional music institutions, where she has attracted musicians from around the globe to study with her. She has conducted numerous workshops in Germany, Austria, Finland, the United States and Japan. Many of her students have gone on to become the bright lights of today’s concert stages.

The mezzo-soprano, who lives in Germany, has received many awards, medals and orders of merit for her extraordinary achievements. For example, her native Japan awarded her the “Shiju Hosho” (the Medal of Honour with Purple Ribbon), a distinction given to only five musicians over the past 50 years. In addition, she was awarded the Bundesverdienstkreuz (Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany) in 2010.

A press kit containing high-resolution photos of the honorary degree recipients is available on Dropbox. Photos have been supplied by the honorands.

— 30 —

NT5

NIC’s Write Here Readers Series looking for emerging writers

October 22, 2018

The NIC English department’s Write Here Readers Series wants to connect with under-represented and emerging writers in the Comox Valey and mid-Island.

We have a limited number of paid reading slots available at our upcoming WHRS events. Come read for 10-15 minutes alongside one of our monthly WHRS featured writers.

The WHRS encourages participation from First Nations writers, disabled writers, LGBTQ2+ writers, homeless writers, student writers and all other young or emerging writers.

For more information, contact Nick van Orden at 250-334-5000 ext. 4189 or at nicholas.vanorden@nic.bc.ca.

NT5

Letter: Canada’s culture of distrust – Quesnel Cariboo Observer

Oct. 23, 2018

We write today to call on you to demonstrate your government’s public commitments to transparency and the renewal of Canada’s relationship with Indigenous peoples by disclosing how Canada calculates its contingent liabilities regarding Indigenous Nations’ land claims – and by affirming your government’s intention to fulfill its outstanding lawful obligations to Indigenous Nations by fairly resolving these claims.

As a recent Globe and Mail article shows, public discourse on claims resolution is being shaped by speculation about Canada’s mounting financial debt to Indigenous communities, as well as widespread misconceptions regarding claims themselves. Canada’s lack of transparency in how it calculates its contingent liabilities, coupled with these misconceptions, creates a culture of distrust and undermines the political will for claims resolution.

Read More: https://www.quesnelobserver.com/opinion/letter-canadas-culture-of-distrust/

BC Government: Qualified professional legislation to restore public trust in natural-resource decision-making

October 22, 2018

VICTORIA – The B.C. government has introduced legislation aimed at making sure decisions affecting the province’s natural resources are science-based, transparent and protect B.C.’s unique environment for future generations.

The Professional Governance Act will, if passed, modernize and strengthen the roles and expectations of qualified professionals in the province, in turn providing greater, science-based public oversight of how B.C.’s natural resources are managed. It will also establish an office of the superintendent of professional governance to ensure consistency and best practices are applied in the work of qualified professionals moving forward.

“This legislation is about making sure we live up to our responsibilities to British Columbians in protecting our natural heritage for our kids and grandkids,” said George Heyman, Minister of Environment and Climate Change Strategy. “British Columbians are rightly proud of our natural resources and environment — they represent who we are and where we’ve come from. This legislation recognizes that legacy and symbolizes a recommitment to putting the public interest first when it comes to managing our natural resources.”

“These changes will help strengthen public trust that the health and safety of their communities always comes first,” said Sonia Furstenau, MLA for Cowichan Valley. “They will also give greater certainty to industry and qualified professionals. I am encouraged that government has acted quickly to implement these key recommendations from Mark Haddock’s report and I am hopeful that we will also see action on his other recommendations.”

The legislation and the establishment of the office of the superintendent of professional governance are intended to increase public access to natural resource information and ensure professionals are held to the highest ethical and technical standards. They are being proposed in response to two recommendations included in the final report of the Professional Reliance Review, submitted in June 2018 following a full public engagement process.

The remainder of the report and recommendations focus on natural resource regulatory regimes. Government is acting on many of these recommendations as part of broader goals and mandate commitments for natural resource management, including strengthening results-based laws, building government capacity for compliance and enforcement, modernizing land-use planning and building partnerships with Indigenous peoples for resource management. Other recommendations will be considered by specific ministries over the coming months.

“The changes we’re proposing will help restore public confidence in the professional reliance model and give certainty to resource companies that rely on qualified professionals,” said Heyman.

Quotes:

Theresa McCurry, CEO, Applied Science Technologists & Technicians of B.C. —

“The new professional reliance legislation could provide Applied Science Technologists & Technicians of BC (ASTTBC) with the authority to govern the respective practice of technology professionals. ASTTBC ensures that its members are certified and competent in their jobs, which is essential for ethical and safe technology practice. These requirements are based on competency assessments, adherence to a code of ethics and a commitment to continuous professional development.”

Christine Gelowitz, RPF, CEO of the Association of B.C. Forest Professionals —

“The Professional Governance Act and office of the superintendent of professional governance will significantly change how forest professionals are governed. We hope these changes will achieve the government’s goal of increasing public confidence in the management of B.C.’s natural resources and we look forward to working with the government on the remaining recommendations that will directly affect management of the land base.”

Bob Peart, co-ordinator, Professional Reliance Working Group of Concerned Citizens —

“We thank the government for taking this first step towards protecting B.C.’s natural resource sector by legislating the governance of qualified professionals. The report shone a spotlight on the myriad ways that the current professional reliance regime is failing communities and ecosystems. We strongly encourage the government to implement the report’s recommendations in their entirety, in a clear and transparent manner; and now await the next steps in the process.”

Bob Fleet, vice-president environment and forestry, Tolko Industries Ltd. —

“Tolko is pleased to support the government’s efforts to improve the British Columbia professional reliance model. We have been included in a comprehensive consultation process that has enabled us to contribute to the new approach to professional reliance. We are hopeful and confident that this new approach will secure the public’s trust that British Columbia’s natural resources are being managed professionally, sustainably and responsibly.”

Ann English, P.Eng., CEO and registrar, Engineers and Geoscientists B.C. —

“We support efforts to improve the regulatory framework and are hopeful that the legislation introduced today can achieve that goal. Changes to regulatory models are complex and require careful implementation, especially when managing areas of practice overlap. We are committed to working with government to ensure this is accomplished to the benefit of the public we both serve.”

JP Ellson, executive director/registrar, British Columbia Institute of Agrologists (BCIA) —

“BCIA welcomes the government granting of practice rights to professional agrologists across the province as that will ensure that all persons working in our field will be subject to the same level of oversight. We look forward to working with government to determine full implementation of all of the recommendations within the Haddock report. Only through full implementation can the challenges within the natural resource sector be addressed.”

Brad Herald, vice-president Western Canada operations, Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers —

“The professional reliance model plays a vital role in maintaining the competitiveness of B.C. We support government’s effort to achieve strong and consistent governance across all professional organizations to ensure responsible resource development.”

Christine Houghton, executive director, College of Applied Biology —

“The legislation introduced today is a result of government’s year-long process to transform how we manage natural resources in B.C. By granting right to practice to applied biology professionals, government has recognized this profession as critical to upholding public confidence. This is a significant step forward to better protect the public interest. We look forward to continuing to work with our partners to implement other critical recommendations in the Haddock report.”

Two backgrounders follow.

BACKGROUNDER 1

Progress on the final report of the professional reliance review

The final report on the professional reliance review made a number of recommendations to improve natural resource regulatory regimes under nine statutes.

As part of broader goals and mandate commitments for natural resource management, government is taking action in a number of areas aligned with the report.

For instance, government has committed to implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and in providing capacity for Indigenous communities to engage in natural resource management.

Work is also underway to modernize land-use planning, revitalize the environmental assessment process, strengthen results-based laws and develop guidance to ensure professionals in B.C.’s natural resource sector are qualified and operate with clear objectives in order to uphold the public interest.

For example, government recently developed professional practice guidelines with Engineers and Geoscientists BC to ensure highway infrastructure is resilient to climate change. In May 2018, government also made amendments to the Riparian Areas Protection Act to improve the management of B.C.’s riparian areas.

In addition, the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy is pursuing opportunities to increase current staffing levels in monitoring, compliance and enforcement.

Ministries that oversee the nine statutes continue to review the recommendations in detail and continue consultation with Indigenous peoples, the business community, environmental groups and other public stakeholders. Consideration of the recommendations will take into account the clarity of expectation required by scientists and professionals who make decisions in the public interest.

BACKGROUNDER 2

Progress on the final report of the professional reliance review

The final report on the professional reliance review made a number of recommendations to improve natural resource regulatory regimes under nine statutes.

As part of broader goals and mandate commitments for natural resource management, government is taking action in a number of areas aligned with the report.

For instance, government has committed to implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and in providing capacity for Indigenous communities to engage in natural resource management.

Work is also underway to modernize land-use planning, revitalize the environmental assessment process, strengthen results-based laws and develop guidance to ensure professionals in B.C.’s natural resource sector are qualified and operate with clear objectives in order to uphold the public interest.

For example, government recently developed professional practice guidelines with Engineers and Geoscientists BC to ensure highway infrastructure is resilient to climate change. In May 2018, government also made amendments to the Riparian Areas Protection Act to improve the management of B.C.’s riparian areas.

In addition, the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy is pursuing opportunities to increase current staffing levels in monitoring, compliance and enforcement.

Ministries that oversee the nine statutes continue to review the recommendations in detail and continue consultation with Indigenous peoples, the business community, environmental groups and other public stakeholders. Consideration of the recommendations will take into account the clarity of expectation required by scientists and professionals who make decisions in the public interest.

 

Contact:

Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy
250 953-3834

NT5

The Future of Forestry is Here – TimberWest

Oct 22, 2018

How technology is transforming BC’s forest industry video just released

Byline: BC Forest Innovation Investment and TimberWest

For forest companies, like TimberWest, the health of the trees and associated ecosystems are paramount. From seedling to maturity, the trees must be monitored and any problems addressed. The way in which this monitoring happens is changing dramatically through the convergence of new sensing technologies such as LiDAR, and the ability to deploy sensing technology using drones.

What was once used only for air space and meteorological research, LiDAR, which stands for LIght Detection And Ranging and is commonly referred to as airborne laser scanning, is now being used for forest research to more accurately examine everything from the height and diameter of trees to ground terrain evaluation and plot-level wood volume estimates.

Read More: https://www.timberwest.com/the-future-of-forestry-is-here/

Diane Jules becomes first Indigenous trustee elected in Kamloops-Thompson – Kamloops This Week

October 22, 2018

The new blood on the Kamloops-Thompson school board is “going to bring some great assets” with them, according to current School District 73 chair Meghan Wade.

Three spots were up for grabs on election night, with newcomers John O’Fee and Heather Grieve seizing the two Kamloops spots and the Area 4 position representing Chase and Sun Peaks going to Diane Jules.

Wade secured the fifth and final trustee seat, with 2,500-plus vote cushion between her and sixth-place finisher Kerri Schill.

Wade cited O’Fee’s legal background and his previous experience on the board, while also pointing to new perspectives Grieve and Jules will bring.

Read More: https://www.kamloopsthisweek.com/news/civic-election/diane-jules-becomes-first-indigenous-trustee-elected-in-kamloops-thompson-1.23472548

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