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Clara Morin Dal Col Re-elected as President of Métis Nation British Columbia

Builds on strong track record in delivering major gains for MNBC citizens and providing strong leadership for entire Métis Nation as MNC’s Minister for Health and Minister for Culture, Heritage and Families.

(September 22, 2020) Clara Morin Dal Col was re-elected President of Métis Nation British Columbia in MNBC’s General Election yesterday.

President Morin Dal Col received a strong mandate from Métis Nation citizens in British Columbia to continue working for Métis Nation citizens in B.C and across the homeland through her service at MNC as National Minister for Health and  National Minister for Culture, Heritage and Families.

She was first elected to the office of MNBC President in September 2016. During her first term, President Morin Dal Col signed the Canada-Métis Nation Accord with the Trudeau government along with the presidents of MNC and other MNC Governing Members. Under the Accord, MNBC was able to pursue its priorities and negotiate unprecedented and substantial federal funding  for housing, early learning and child development, post-secondary education, the Michif language, and economic development in B.C.

Clara Morin Dal Col was born in Ile a La Crosse, Saskatchewan where Michif was the first language spoken at home. As MNC Minister of Culture, Heritage and Families, she played an important role in the development of federal legislation to revitalize and promote Indigenous languages including Michif as well as federal legislation to enable Métis governments to assume jurisdiction over child and family services.  As National Minister of Health, she will assume an important role in MNC’s work with the federal government on co-developing distinctions-based Indigenous health legislation and the development and delivery of health services for the Métis Nation communities.

MNC’ s National Spokesperson and MMF President David Chartrand welcomed the election results in BC.

“I am very pleased with Clara’s re-election. She is a true Métis nationalist who has really delivered for her people in B.C. and has stood up for the Métis Nation as a whole through her important work at the MNC.”

INTERIM ELECTION RESULTS

Visit MNBC’s website for more update: www.mnbc.ca

President

  • Bruce Dumont: 400
  • Walter Mineault: 890
  • Clara Morin Dal Col: 1,220

Vice-President

  • Gary Biggar: 584
  • Lissa Dawn Smith: 1,913

Women BC Chair

  • Dr. Kate Elliot: 973
  • Lee Fraser: 371

Youth BC Chair

  • Shaughn Davoren: 209
  • Braydi Rice: 178

Region 1 Vancouver Island & Powell River

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

  • Michael Dumont: 158
  • Patrick Harriott: 246
  • Timothy Low: 95

REGIONAL WOMEN’S REPRESENTATIVE

  • Fleurette Borsboom: 136
  • Zoe Edgar-Wilson: 131

Region 2 Lower Mainland

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

  • Louis De Jaeger: 423
  • Leonard Laboucan: 216

Region 3 Thompson & Okanagan

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

  • Cheryl Dodman: 119
  • Dean Gladue: 301
  • Daniel Pitman: 133

Region 4 Kootenays

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

  • Terrance Anonson: 69
  • Donald Courson: 62
  • Debra Fisher: 141

REGIONAL WOMEN’S REPRESENTATIVE

  • Wendy Schneider: 47
  • Jana Schulz: 92

Region 5 North Central

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

  • Raynie Gervais: 201
  • Marlene Swears: 115

Region 7 Northeast

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

  • Jacqueline Alderking: 44
  • Paulette Flamond: 72

NT5

TNG: September 21, 2020 – COVID-19 Update

Our continued response COVID-19

TNG remains committed to keeping our employees and the communities we serve safe.
Therefore, we are sharing the following information.

Confirmed Cases

As the virus continues to spread throughout BC and Canada, we are calling on everyone to do their part to stop the spread of COVID-19 by continuing to practice social distancing and following the guidelines set up by the province and the health authorities. The number of confirmed cases reported are as follows;

September 14, 2020

Total new cases: 366 (since Friday)
Total cases in BC: 8,208
Total recoveries: 5,972 (1,987 active cases)
Total deaths: 227
Total cases in Interior Health region: 508
Total cases in Northern Health region: 255
In Self-isolation: 3,233

TNG is here for you

We remain closed to the public; however, our staff can be reached by phone or email.

TNG Downtown Office: Ph: (250) 392-3918

TNG Lakeside Office: Ph: (778) 799 -2145

TNG Health Office: Ph:(250) 398-8575

The Health Office is open regular hours, Monday to Friday from 8:30 am – 4:30 pm. The Health staff will also be making visits to community where needed.

Resources to stay up-to-date on COVID-19

Tŝilhqot’in National Government – Emergency Page

Government of Canada – Public Health

Government of BC – Health Link BC

First Nations Health Authority

World Health Organization

NT5

Tla’amin Nation: State of Emergency Order Extended

Tla’amin Nation is reporting 31 active cases of COVID-19. People who have tested positive for COVID-19 or have been in contact with those experiencing COVID-19 symptoms have been contacted by Vancouver Coastal Health and directed to isolate to help prevent further spread. Self-isolating at home is the best way to prevent the spread of contagious respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19.

State of Emergency Continues and additional measures in place
In response to the increase in COVID-19 cases over the weekend, the Tla’amin Nation Executive Council enacted an extension to the Local State of Emergency Order until September 29, 2020. The State of Emergency Order allows for additional protective protocols to remain in places to help flatten the curve.

“We have witnessed some individuals not obeying local or provincial orders, this is both selfish and irresponsible,” said Hegus Clint Williams. “Everyone is reminded to keep the course and stay strong. All our actions count. We do no want to be in an outbreak situation and have to enforce another Shelter in Place order.”

In line with the State of Local Emergency Extension, the Tla’amin Nation nightly curfew from 9 pm to 6 am remains in effect, and access to the community continues to be restricted to Tla’amin residents only, with the exception of a few volunteers who have been pre-screened and approved WCB COVID-19 compliant contractors and delivery companies.

The checkpoint at Sliammon Road will remain in place until further notice. Tla’amin residents must continue to inform checkpoint staff of where they are going when departing the community and when they plan to return. Masks will be available at the checkpoint and must be worn at all times when interacting with the public.

COVID-19 Testing Scheduled for September 22, 2020 from 1:30 pm to 3:30 pm at Tla’amin Health Offices

The Nation is strongly urging to you to seek testing if you are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms. Symptoms include headache, fever, cough, fatigue, shortness of breath, muscle pain, lack of appetite, and abdominal distress. The testing event will end at promptly at 3:30 pm so that test samples can be flown to Vancouver for analysis. For more information on testing please call 604-483-3009. Tla’amin Health is reminding residents to keep your social bubbles small to limit potential exposures. Large gatherings, including parties, are not permitted in Tla’amin Nation.

First responders continue to respond to non-COVID-19 calls

First responders including police, fire, ambulance and social services continue to respond to non-COVID-19 related calls. First responders will arrive to distress calls wearing all required personal protective equipment. Those requiring harm reduction services and supplies can call 604-223-4430 for confidential help. Tla’amin members with questions or requiring help with grocery essentials can call 604-578-0447. If you require any assistance, please do not hesitate to reach out. If you witness any COVID-19 violations or suspicious behavior, please call the 911 emergency line. You can call anonymously.

“During these difficult times, our Nation, our residents and our neighbours continue to come together to show leadership and support for one another, Said Hegus Clint Williams. “There were no food hamper orders over the weekend. That indicates no house is going without food and that checkpoint operations continue to be effective.”

As we face this unprecedented COVID-19 situation, we must always stay safe, stay kind, and remain calm.

The Nation is committed to protecting our residents and the surrounding region as we take proactive measures to combat the spread of COVID-19. We continue to remain transparent, and we appreciate the support of our essential workers and community.

Media Contact:
Steve Gallagher | 604-578-8483

NT5

A Calling From Childhood – FNHA

Sep 21, 2020

Retired nurse Molly Smith Glaser shares her story and her path to nursing​

2020 is the International Year of the Nurse and Mid-Wife. In celebration and recognition, we will feature stories all year long of nurses and midwives from across the province and the great work they do for BC First Nations people and communities.

Molly Smith Glaser is quick to correct me when I refer to her as the first Indigenous nurse in BC – “I was the second,” she tells me with a laugh, revealing her humble nature.

The truth is, Molly is an inspiration to many people, and not just those who first suggested she be interviewed as we honour nurses and midwives during the International Year of the Nurse and Midwife. From Musgamagw Dzawada’enuxw Nation, and the Gwayasdums Community on Gilford Island, Molly’s desire to be a nurse became reality because of her incredible determination and resilience – she had to overcome and conquer many obstacles in her way.

Read More: https://www.fnha.ca/about/news-and-events/news/a-calling-from-childhood

BCAFN Regional Chief Terry Teegee and BCAFN Women’s Representative, Louisa Housty-Jones Statement for Gender Equality Week

September 21-25 marks Gender Equality Week in Canada. The purpose of Gender Equality Week is multidimensional. Through it, we acknowledge the significant contributions that women and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people have made and continue to make in our communities and society.

This week is also a time to renew dedication toward addressing the systemic issues of sexism, racism, colonialism, patriarchy, homophobia, and transphobia that result in poverty, homelessness, sexual exploitation, gender-based violence, isolation, social and political exclusion, abuse, incarceration, and barriers to education, employment, equal pay, social services, legal services, childcare, and positions of leadership. Indigenous women, transgender, and two-spirit people, those who are elderly, live with disabilities, or are visible minority women and gender diverse individuals, often experience these inequalities even more acutely.

Colonial policies and legislation have directly contributed to the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and Two-Spirit People genocide. In a time when the status-quo is being disrupted and re-envisioned across society, now is the time to examine our relationships, priorities and actions as they relate to gender equality and justice.

Finally, we also bring attention to the ever-present need to confront harmful gender stereotypes.

“I want to honour and encourage all of the women and 2SLGBTQQIA+ individuals in our communities who are reconnecting with their identities as strong First Nations peoples, and with the valuable roles we have to play in our families and communities. I know this is often challenging work, but you are not alone, and I truly believe this is the path to wellness,” stated BCAFN Women’s Representative, Louisa Housty-Jones.

“Urgent action is needed to ensure the human rights of Indigenous women and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people are upheld, in particular. We need a MMIWG2S National Action Plan that is led by Indigenous women and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, survivors, and families, and coordinated among all levels of government, including Indigenous governments,” stated Regional Chief Terry Teegee.

To mark this week, each day the BCAFN is celebrating the accomplishments of diverse Indigenous women from across BC. Discover their stories on our website or on our social media pages (Facebook, Twitter).

To learn more about how BCAFN is advancing and advocating for gender equity, visit our website.

Bill C-309, the Gender Equality Week Act, was introduced by Sven Spengemann, Member of Parliament for Mississauga–Lakeshore. It received Royal Assent on June 21, 2018. This legislation designates the fourth week in September as Gender Equality Week.

NT5

MNBC: Interim Election Results

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After roughly 8 hours of sorting and counting, all streamed live for the first time, MNBC has elected a new government to advocate and represent the interests of the Métis in British Columbia. Below are interim election results for MNBC’s 2020 Election. In the coming days the Chief Electoral Officer will provide final official results, which will have an official tally of how many Citizens voted in the 2020 election. Stay tuned for details on the swearing-in of Regional Representatives and the new Government in the coming weeks.

INTERIM ELECTION RESULTS

President

  • Bruce Dumont: 400
  • Walter Mineault: 890
  • Clara Morin Dal Col: 1,220

Vice-President

  • Gary Biggar: 584
  • Lissa Dawn Smith: 1,913

Women BC Chair

  • Dr. Kate Elliot: 973
  • Lee Fraser: 371

Youth BC Chair

  • Shaughn Davoren: 209
  • Braydi Rice: 178

Region 1 Vancouver Island & Powell River

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

  • Michael Dumont: 158
  • Patrick Harriott: 246
  • Timothy Low: 95

REGIONAL WOMEN’S REPRESENTATIVE

  • Fleurette Borsboom: 136
  • Zoe Edgar-Wilson: 131

REGIONAL YOUTH REPRESENTATIVE

  • Taylor Devine (Acclaimed)

Region 2 Lower Mainland

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

  • Louis De Jaeger: 423
  • Leonard Laboucan: 216

REGIONAL YOUTH REPRESENTATIVE

  • Matthew Lindsay (Acclaimed)

Region 3 Thompson & Okanagan

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

  • Cheryl Dodman: 119
  • Dean Gladue: 301
  • Daniel Pitman: 133

REGIONAL WOMEN’S REPRESENTATIVE

  • Judy Lina van Wieringen (Acclaimed)

REGIONAL YOUTH REPRESENTATIVE

  • Jamie-Lee Keith (Acclaimed)

Region 4 Kootenays

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

  • Terrance Anonson: 69
  • Donald Courson: 62
  • Debra Fisher: 141

REGIONAL WOMEN’S REPRESENTATIVE

  • Wendy Schneider: 47
  • Jana Schulz: 92

REGIONAL YOUTH REPRESENTATIVE

  • Drew Nagao (Acclaimed)

Region 5 North Central

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

  • Raynie Gervais: 201
  • Marlene Swears: 115

REGIONAL WOMEN’S REPRESENTATIVE

  • Melissa Phung (Acclaimed)

REGIONAL YOUTH REPRESENTATIVE

  • Justin Turner (Acclaimed)

Region 6 Northwest

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

  • Susie Hooper (Acclaimed)

REGIONAL YOUTH REPRESENTATIVE

  • Briana Greer (Acclaimed)

Region 7 Northeast

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

  • Jacqueline Alderking: 44
  • Paulette Flamond: 72

REGIONAL WOMEN’S REPRESENTATIVE

  • Carol Paynter (Acclaimed)

NT5

Squamish Nation: Covid-19 Community Update

Current numbers

We are pleased to confirm that there were no new cases reported over the weekend or today. Our total case number remains at 41 (37 lab confirmed, 4 epi-linked).

No new data on recovery has been received since last week. As of our last update, 35 of the 41 cases had been cleared, leaving 6 active cases in the community.

Chet kw’enmantúmiyap (we thank you all) for continuing with your commitment to help us flatten the curve in our communities.

Provincial update
Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry’s daily briefing today covered three days since the latest update on Friday, reporting 366 new cases of COVID-19 in BC, as well as and four more deaths.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, 8,207 British Columbians have contracted the virus, and 227 have passed away.

In light of this ongoing spike in new cases, Dr. Henry continues to urge British Columbians to stick to a social bubble of six people for any gatherings. She also reiterated that indoor gatherings are always riskier that outdoor gatherings.

Even though the numbers in our communities are going down, the virus is still all around us, and we need to remain vigilant.

Reminder re: COVID-19 Needs Assessment Survey
Today is the final day to complete the COVID-19 Needs Assessment Survey for the purpose of identifying current COVID-19-related needs in our community.

Please take a few short minutes to complete the short survey if you haven’t already done so. It should take no more than five minutes to complete.

Survey link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HN2CWF6

Reminder re: Masks & Gloves Available
A reminder that we have both fabric and disposable masks available, as well as disposable gloves. If you or any members of your household need masks or gloves, please call 604-982-7610 to request these items.

Please note that these items are not restricted to households who are self-isolating. Masks and gloves will be distributed upon request to all members who need them.

Public Health Measures
As always, let’s keep up the great work by continuing to:
• Keep your bubble small
• Maintain 2m/6ft distance between you and anyone outside your bubble
• Wear a mask anywhere that social distancing may be a challenge
• Wash your hands frequently
• Don’t touch your face

Reminder re: Isolation Supports through Member Services
If you are self-isolating due to COVID-19, please don’t hesitate to reach out. Our Member Services team is providing a wide range of assistance to meet the needs of those in isolation.

Call 604-982-7610 during business hours, or 604-505-3776 after hours.

NT5

BCAFN: Long-term agreement guarantees 25 years of revenue shared with First Nations

VICTORIA – First Nations in B.C. and the provincial government completed and signed a 23-year agreement on Sept. 16, 2020, that will see the Province share approximately $3 billion in gaming revenue.

The agreement supports Indigenous self-government and self-determination, strong, healthy communities and services that make life better for First Nations communities and people.

“Being able to count on this secure and long-term revenue can transform communities and lives – as two years of initial funding already started to show,” said Premier John Horgan. “Locking in these revenues for 25 years is part of our government’s ongoing commitment to reconciliation, ensuring First Nations can plan for the long term and invest in the services they decide their communities need to thrive and prosper.”

More than 97% of eligible First Nations in B.C. have joined the First Nations Gaming Revenue Sharing Limited Partnership and started receiving their share of new revenue in September 2019 under an interim two-year agreement. The completion of the long-term agreement guarantees their share of gaming revenue for the subsequent 23 years.

“This agreement marks an exciting commitment from the Province to B.C. First Nations, as it relates to gaming revenue, that inspires hope regarding the application of United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and informs how we can engage in successful government-to-government relations,” said Judith Sayers, co-chair, BC First Nations Gaming Commission. “We look forward to building on these successes with positive results from the upcoming Phase 2 negotiations, including enhanced First Nations access to gaming opportunities.”

The agreement is the first major multilateral agreement with First Nations that substantively incorporates the UN Declaration, following the passage of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act in November 2019.

“In the first two years of the agreement, we’ve seen many success stories from First Nations and their utilization of gaming revenues,” said Michael Bonshor, co-chair, BC First Nations Gaming Revenue Sharing Limited Partnership. “We look forward to continued positive impact for B.C. First Nations.”

First Nations determine how their communities will benefit best from the revenue. The revenue may be invested in:
• health and wellness;

• infrastructure, safety, transportation and housing;

• economic and business development;

• education, language, culture and training;

• community development and environmental protection; and

• capacity building, fiscal management and governance.

“With this funding, First Nations can continue to build on plans that will make a real difference in their communities,” said Scott Fraser, Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation. “Already, we’ve seen communities able to start new projects building housing and community centres, protecting homes from wildfires, and expanding language programs – and there will be many more examples in the years ahead.”

The long-term agreement will provide certainty for First Nations in B.C. to share in the Province’s gaming revenues for 25 years. In 2019, the Province made amendments to the Gaming Control Act, establishing an entitlement to 7% of the BC Lottery Corporation’s net income.

The BC First Nations Gaming Revenue Sharing Limited Partnership is governed by a five-person board of directors. In addition to administering the distribution of funding to eligible First Nations, it provides regular reporting to an independent auditor jointly appointed by the Province and the limited partnership.

Quotes:
David Eby, Attorney General
“This partnership reinforces our government’s commitment to work alongside First Nations, sharing guaranteed long-term funding that will build up communities and give Indigenous peoples improved access to the services that they rely on, now and into the future.”

Kukpi7 Judy Wilson, Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs
“B.C. reached this momentous agreement after years of persistence by our leadership. The agreement is certainly a testament to the drive of our First Nations in B.C. to see self-determination and self-governance become the cornerstones of healthy, empowered First Nation communities. This agreement not only helps First Nations use gaming revenue to build strong, sustainable economies, but sets a precedent for how the United Nations Declaration can be meaningfully incorporated into future accords to foster and support Indigenous leadership and resiliency.”

Robert Phillips, political executive, First Nations Summit
“We are very pleased this long-term agreement has been finalized. These annual funds will provide B.C. First Nations the ability to address a vast array of community needs. As we have said before, these annual investments into communities will measurably enhance the economy of both Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities, supporting the concept that healthy Indigenous economies ultimately benefit all British Columbians.”

Regional Chief Terry Teegee, British Columbia Assembly of First Nations
“The benefit and impact of this long-term agreement will be significant in promoting and enhancing community-driven priorities and initiatives. This funding will flow directly to First Nations, subsequently supporting First Nations’ goals and projects. We are beginning to see free, prior and informed consent as components of government-to-government agreements, thanks to the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act. I look forward to the ongoing discussions and the completion of negotiations related to Phase 2, implementing gaming operations and jurisdiction within our own territories, which will empower First Nations to operate and manage their own gaming institutions.”

Quick Facts:
• As part of an interim agreement, the Province transferred $194.84 million in August 2019 for the first two years. The next payment will be transferred in April 2021.

• In 2018-19, the B.C. government collected $1.4 billion in net revenue from gaming activities.

• Under the long-term agreement, 7% of net provincial gaming revenues per year will be distributed to First Nations communities through 2044-45 based on the following formula:

  • 50% base funding (divided equally among eligible First Nations);
  • 40% based on population; and
  • 10% for geographically remote communities.

Learn More:
First Nations Gaming Revenue Sharing Limited Partnership: https://www.bcfngamingrevenue.ca/

Contacts:
Cale Cowan
Media Relations
Ministry Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation
250 812-4510

Jay Johnson
BC First Nations Gaming Commission
250 818-3020

Jeunesse Mirbach
BC First Nations Gaming Revenue Sharing Limited Partnership
778 215-8415

NT5

Indigenous languages finding a way forward – UVic News

In the face of a global pandemic, language revitalization continues to thrive in Indigenous communities across Canada and the world, according to new research by Indigenous education scholar, Onowa McIvor.

In June of this year, McIvor, who this month became University of Victoria’s newest President’s Chair, received COVID-19 Emergency Research Funding from the Faculty of Education to conduct a short-term study of the effects of COVID-19 on Indigenous language revitalization work.

Over the summer, a small research team sought to understand how language teachers and learners responded to the pandemic through use of an online survey and analysis of language revitalization social media pages. Early findings show that many communities have successfully adapted in ways that allowed for the continuation of language revitalization. The study also illustrates the vital role that language is playing in keeping communities safe and informed during a time of crisis. McIvor will discuss these findings as part of a Sept. 23 panel focused on accelerating community resilience during the pandemic.

Read More: https://www.uvic.ca/news/topics/2020+indigenous-languages-way-forward+news

NIC Orange Shirt Day

Orange Shirt Day is an important day to honour and listen to residential school survivors and remember those that were lost due to oppressive educational systems.

At NIC recognize that as an educational institution we have a responsibility to honour, respect, and support Indigenous cultures and identities as we move towards a future of reconciliation and hope.

In recognition of Orange Shirt Day, we are honouring the voices of Indigenous members of the NIC community and highlighting ways in which non-Indigenous members of the NIC community also work to celebrate and support Indigenous cultures and identities. Whether it is in student services, program initiatives or partnerships with various Indigenous communities, we are working to make education accessible, respectful and welcoming to Indigenous peoples.

“Today is a day to honour and remember residential school survivors and their families. We must also remember those children that never made it and are no long with us. Today is a day for survivors to tell their stories and for us to listen with open hearts.” – Phyllis Webstad.

Join the conversation

Check back soon for more information on how to join the NIC Orange Shirt activities on social media and share your voice about the importance of honouring residential school survivors and celebrating Indigenous voices, cultures and identities.

Listen to Survivors’ Stories

Phyllis Webstad- Orange Shirt Day Presentation

Eddy Charlie shares. Eddy is a residential school survivor who started Victoria Orange Shirt Day. Watch his video and listen to his interview with Gregor Craigie with CBC.

Virtual Events and Videos

Free Orange Shirt Day Online Classroom (Exploring the New Orange Shirt Day Book)

Xe Xe Smun’eem, Victoria Orange Shirt Day  | Xe Xe Smun’eem (Sacred Children) Victoria Orange Shirt Day Video

Orange Shirt Day Story with Phyllis Webstad Hosted by UBC 

Resources

History of Orange Shirt Day

The History of Orange Shirt Day

How Orange Shirt Came to Be

Resources for Survivors

NIC Counselling – counselling and support resources for NIC students

Healing and wellness resources from the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre

NIC Initiatives & Stories

NIC Library & Learning Commons Library Guides:

Nurses Learning Our Way, From the Land, With the People, A Collaborative Experience

Student experiences

Nursing

Metal Jewellery Design

Events

NT5

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